A Beautiful Mess

I can definitely identify with the mess part…. Now I just need to believe the “beautiful” part….

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Flow

This quote reminded of the term “flow”, described by psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (How do we even pronounce that) as:

“A state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter; the experience is so enjoyable that people will continue to do it even at great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it.”

And these are the 8 characteristics of flow:

  1. Complete concentration on the task
  2. Clarity of goals and reward in mind and immediate feedback
  3. Transformation of time (speeding up/slowing down of time)
  4. The experience is intrinsically rewarding
  5. Effortlessness and ease
  6. There is a balance between challenge and skills
  7. Actions and awareness are merged, losing self-conscious rumination
  8. There is a feeling of control over the task

Source

 

This prompted me to reflect and examine the frequency with which I currently experience this state of flow in my job (because that’s important to me!).

Yes, when I conduct sessions, I can see how being “in the zone”, having my skills and the challenge at hand being equally matched, seeing the natural and connected engagement with the children, creates the circumstances for flow to take place, which contributes to my perception of meaning and joy.

I suppose it is when we are unable to experience this state of flow in what we do, that the tasks and job may become more tedious and arduous. How do you feel flow in a session with the little boy who is screaming his head off, or with the one who is scratching his peers and everyone is just trying to stop him but making things worse, or with the little girl who is crying because she wants her favourite snack and the teacher is refusing to give in to her?

I think that’s when being able to be in the moment and taking the stance of an observer can really help a lot. Thinking “Wow, this is a difficult situation” instead of “I AM in a difficult situation” can really make a lot of difference in how we react and/or respond to the challenges. It certainly takes practice, and I’m still working on it 🙂

Sydney 2018 – What I Learnt

An important lesson I learnt in Sydney was this:
You can travel to the ends of the earth, but you cannot run away from the things inside you. The trip was wonderful and relaxing and all, and I met my aim of revisiting old memories and creating new ones.

Yet…

The body will have its way of telling you that something is wrong, be it the constant pains and aches in the chest, the feeling that something is stuck in your throat, or the unpredictable tearfulness.

I realise I have always thought of my adult self as someone who is “with it”, “steady”, “in-control”… And when those images of myself began to fall apart… it was scary, naturally.

When I look back, it was probably only my spiritual practices and divine grace that continued to keep me grounded during those days when I couldn’t explain what was happening to me and with my emotions.

 

Something to remember when I feel the inertia to wake up that 30-45minutes earlier in the morning! 😉

Thank you Sydney, for the memories and lessons. Till next time!

 

 

Everything in its Time