“Don’t Steal My Dust!”

One of the inevitable side effects of teaching music in a classroom is that sometimes, the classroom instruments become more than that – they become weapons of childish acts of revenge, objects to tease with, objects which can be used to get attention.

After a particular trifle between 2 groups in which Boomwhackers were hurled through the air, I got them to stay back after class to Talk.

Long story short – after rounds of blame-pushing and fact-crosschecking, the culprits finally owned up to their actions and agreed to accept the consequences.

Still feeling angsty over their misbehaviour, I then curtly told them to make it quick and to make sure I can see how much dust they have each cleaned from the room. The 2 boys picked up the brooms and started sweeping earnestly. After a while, 2 small mounds of dust accumulated  on the floor. Boy1, after sweeping his mound into the dustpan, went over to Boy2’s mound and attempted to do the same. Boy2 became startled. “Hey!! Don’t steal my dust!!”

That he would be so protective over a mound of dust tickled me to no end.

Almost at once, I felt the irritation and angst over their earlier misbehavior dissipate, and I saw them for what they simply are: Young boys who are growing up. With hormones and all.

I allowed myself to crack a half-smile (even though I really wanted to burst into laughter), and told them there was lots more dust under the teacher’s table and under the stacks of chairs. It became almost like a game, with them trying to show me how much dust they could each collect.

I went back to the staffroom and shared the dusty story with a colleague, and we had a good laugh over it.

Self care for the day, done!

Redha

My first time watching a movie at Golden Mile. It was a bit of a walk from Lavender, and we emerged from the theatre on a cold, wet and unfamiliar Sunday afternoon, my stomach empty and grumbling, but it felt worth it. Especially since all profits  were going to the Autism Association!

The film portrays the lives of a couple with an autistic son, Danial.  Some parts felt like an educational documentary, but I could see why it would be important to use such a powerful platform to reach out to the masses. And all things considered, I thought it was a very realistic portrayal of the struggles a family unit goes through when they live with a person with special needs, and how acceptance and support from different blocks of society can really make a difference in meaning and quality of life.

Just before the film started, the audience was asked to observe a few moments of silence for the female lead, as her own child had just passed away that morning.

It made me think: Aren’t the hearts of parents universally the same? They just want their children to grow up happy.

Everything in its Time

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